Productivity, more buffet than prix fixe

Productivity, more buffet than prix fixe

food-wood-tomatoesOn any given week, as a consumer of all things productivity and time-management, I come across another article hailing the wonder that is Pomodoro. If you haven’t heard about Pomodoro (the Italian word for tomato) is a technique where you use a timer to break down activities into 25 minute chunks, followed by a short break, and after a set number of these pomodoros as they are known, you take a break for a longer period of time. The idea is that during those 25 minutes you are focused on the task at hand, and because there is a short break after each period, your brain has a chance to reset without the temptation to mentally disconnect during your actual task. Many people swear by this technique to be more productive during the workday, and I’m including a link http://pomodorotechnique.com/get-started/ for any of you who are interested in learning more about it. To me, Pomodoro seems like the prix fixe menu at a restaurant. If you choose to eat there, you will be eating the same food as everybody else, and the cost will be the same for everyone. There is some rigidity in a prix fixe menu, as is there with the Pomodoro technique. While you can tweak it a bit (maybe mixed vegetables instead of steamed broccoli as a side dish; 20 minute intervals rather than 25) the overall product will largely remain the same. This approach for maximum productivity will work for some, but overall approaching time-management and productivity as a buffet of choices where you build the best plate for you seems like a better choice. Are your most productive hours in the morning or in the afternoon? How long of a break do you realistically need to recharge before switching to another task? Is it easier or possible to delegate some tasks to others so you can focus on big picture projects? All the while, adjusting and re-adjusting as needed based on the day, the amount of work or activities that need to be accomplished and importantly your energy level.  As long as you don’t spend all your time choosing the methods and techniques for productivity to fill your plate with, and not enough actually being productive and getting things done, you can keep going back for seconds over and over again.

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